All posts tagged: vegetable oils

VEGETABLE OILS

The most important thing to remember about vegetable oils is that they are unstable and far more prone to turning rancid when exposed to oxygen, light – far more so than saturated animal fats. For this reason liquid vegetable oils should always be stored in dark bottles, away from sunlight in a cool spot and are best consumed unheated in salad dressings or mayonnaise-style sauces as they traditionally always were. Vegetable oils are best used for gentle sautéing rather than high-heat frying because of their propensity to turn rancid. One key distinguishing feature between traditional vegetable oils and fake, new vegetable oils is that the former derive from the fruit of the plant (such as the olive or the coconut) whilst the latter derives from the seeds of the plant (such as sunflower-seed, rape-seed, seeds of the soya-bean plant, cotton-seed, grape-seed). Most seed oils (though not all) are fake foods and are best avoided. (For a complete list of real food and the fakes see below). Vegetable oils are referred to either as polyunsaturated or …

NON-TRADITIONAL VEGETABLE OILS – THE FAKES

-: sunflower-seed oil, rape-seed oil, soya-seed oil, grape-seed oil, cotton-seed oil :- One molecule away from plastic? The process of refining seed vegetable oils into either cooking oil or hydrogenated vegetable fat for either domestic or industrial use is a classic example of how the industrial cook has managed to bastardise fresh produce into a fake food product to suit their economic purposes not our nutritional needs – and then present it to the everyday cook as healthy and fit for purpose. It is perhaps a bit of a misnomer to suggest that margarine and vegetable shortening derived from seed vegetable oils are one molecule away from plastic – but the sentiment (if not the science) is sound. HOW NEW SEED VEGETABLE OILS ARE REFINED: There are three problems associated with the relatively new seed vegetable oils: Firstly, when cold pressed they taste bitter and unpalatable resulting in a small if non-existent market for them.  Secondly, being polyunsaturated they are highly unstable and prone to turning rancid when exposed to oxygen, light and heat. Thirdly, most …