All posts filed under: Summer Recipes

Mayonnaise

A fresh, home-made mayonnaise is not only a delicious accompaniment or condiment to your meal the raw olive oil and eggs are literally packed with easy to digest natural enzymes and nutrients that have not been killed off by high-heat processing or sterilisation. The flavour derives from the combination of creamy eggs, mustard and the distinctive flavour of olives that is a feature of cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil. The fresh egg yokes emulsify the sauce – not fake, novel ingredient such as xanthan or soy lecithin. It takes next to no time to whisk up – either by hand or with a blender and once you see how easy it is to make and how natural the flavours are it is unlikely you’ll be tempted to buy a commercial fake ever again. If you want to benefit from the nutrients as well as the flavour only use cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil. All other liquid vegetable oils (bar linseed oil) are fakes and you will be consuming neutered, nutritionally defunct food packed with energy but …

Sour-cream and chives cucumber salad

Ingredients 1 fresh cucumber, sour-cream (or fresh cream), white wine vinegar, chives, salt & pepper, 1 tea-spoon of honey or sugar. Directions Peel the cucumber. Using the side of a cheese grater slice the cucumber into wafer thin slices.  Pinching some sea salt between fingers and thumb sprinkle the salt over the sliced cucumber and leave to rest for approx. half an hour and leave to rest until the juice has leached out of the cucumbers. For the vinaigrette Mix the vinegar with the sugar, salt & pepper and chives. Stir in the sour cream (or fresh cream) into the vinegar. Squeeze the residual water out of the sliced cucumbers before adding to the vinaigrette. You can chill the residual cucumber juice and drink as a refreshing tonic later. For the more adventurous add some grated ginger to the vinaigrette – the delicate flavour of the cucumber combines naturally with ginger to make a refreshing salad.

Greek Tzatziki

Making this refreshing home-made and nutritious sauce is about as easy and as quick as opening a packet of sugared cereal and pouring milk on top. Really it takes five minutes maximum to prepare. Unlike commercial tzatziki your home-made tzatziki will not have been pasteurised and hence is packed full of natural nutrients plus plenty of beneficial bacteria to replenish and spoil you and your family’s human biome. On it’s own it tastes nice. OK. Teamed up with my Greek-style burgers  – or any cooked or grilled meat for that matter it comes into its own and shines like a star on your dish. This is probably because your senses are telling you – this yoghurt brimming with healthy bacteria and enzymes is just what I need to help digest the cooked meat. Ingredients Roughly ¼ of a cucumber, yoghurt or sour cream, olive oil, mint or fennel or any seasonal herb you like the look of, olive oil, salt & pepper. Directions Grate the cucumber into a bowl. Add three to four tablespoons of yoghurt. Season with …

Salt pickled tomato and chilli salsa

So few of us, myself included until recently, have ever fermented anything in our lives. So few of us, myself included, have seen anyone ferment food. So few of us have tasted home-made fermented foods. This means a big leap into the unknown. The truth is fermenting vegetables couldn’t be easier – but you’ll only discover this if you give it a bash. Keep practicing until you’ve mastered the technique. It’s not difficult. The chemistry and mastery of these food will work – it’s worked for population over thousands of years and will continue to do so. If you are worried about fermented food “going-off” consider this statement by Fred Breidt an expert working for the USDA and who is a specialist on fermented vegetables “There has never been a documented case of foodborne illness from fermented vegetables. Risky is not a word I would use to describe vegetable fermentation.” Because it is fermented you can keep this stored in a jar in the fridge over the winter and it will not deteriorate – it will only …

Two different tomato soups

I’ve decided not to give exact amounts for this recipe because a soup is an intuitive business dependant on how many you are cooking for. You can decide to use 5 kg of fresh summer tomatoes and freeze the excess for the winter or you can make a soup with just four or five tomatoes if you’re cooking for two. For the cream of tomato soup I always use proportionally less carrots to tomatoes since this is, after all a tomato not carrot, soup. Thus, for 5 kg of tomatoes I might use 2 kg of carrots. For 1 kg of tomatoes 300 gr carrots etc. Cooking thankfully, unlike civil engineering, is not an exact science – learn to go with the flow. The choice of tomatoes is up to you. See what’s cheapest and best looking on the market and what you like the look of – Romana, tiny colourful cherry tomatoes, big fat Coeur du boeuf … you choose. I’ve made great tomato soups with all kinds of fresh tomatoes. Cream of tomato soup …

Tomato Salads

There are hundreds of ways to make a good tomato salad – from simply slicing the fresh summer tomatoes and drizzling some good quality olive oil over them to making a balsamic vinegar dressing and adding mozzarella, feta or any good quality cheese such as traditionally made gouda or cheddar. Fresh, summer tomato salads are always a hit – even with picky children. Use any tomatoes that look ripe and fresh – from small cherry tomatoes to big fat Coeur du boeuf . Plain tomato salad Slice fresh tomatoes and place on a serving plate. Sprinkle with finely chopped onion or chives, salt & pepper and fresh basil. Sprinkle generously with olive oil and serve as is. Mozzarella tomato salad in a balsamic vinaigrette Ingredients Fresh summer tomatoes, balsamic vinegar, olive oil, honey or sugar, basil, mozzarella or feta or gouda or any cheese you like the look of. Directions Add a good glug of balsamic vinegar into a bowl. Mix in a tea-spoon of sugar, salt & pepper and fresh herbs such as chives, fennel and basil. …

Summer burgers

Greek-style summer burgers Inspired by Rondou’s best Greek burgers Ingredients Lamb mince/ground meat (approx. 200 gr per adult portion), bread crumbs (approx. 80 gr per adult portion), 1 Egg, a handful of fresh mint, feta cheese, salt & pepper. Directions In a big bowl mix the minced meat with the bread crumbs, chopped mint, crumbled feta cheese, egg and season generously with salt & pepper. Only use one egg – more than that can make the mixture too sticky. If you’re only intending to make a small batch just use the yoke of the egg. Pat into the shape of a burger and place on tray until ready to use. Great for either a BBQ or just frying up in a pan. Serve with a yoghurt and cucumber tzatziki sauce – a great way to eat fresh enzymes and feed your microbiome alongside the cooked food. Dutch-style summer burgers Ingredients Beef mince/ground meat (approx. 200gr per adult portion), bread crumbs (approx. 80 gr per adult portion), 1 egg, a bunch of fresh parsley and chives, grated gouda. salt …

Caesar Salad

Ingredients Chicken breast (approx. 100 gr per adult portion), juice of half a lemon, tarragon (optional), anchovies (tinned or fresh), 4 eggs, olive oil or cold-pressed linseed oil, 1 cos/romaine lettuce, salt & pepper, seasonal fresh herbs Directions Cut the chicken breasts into long strips of around two centimetres. Marinate the chicken, for at least one hour (longer if possible), in the juice of half a lemon, a splash of olive oil, chopped tarragon, salt and pepper. When you are happy that the chicken has marinated long enough fry it in olive oil on a medium heat until the chicken strips have turned a caramelised brown. Set to one side. For the sauce: Blend one whole egg plus the yoke of an egg with 3-4 fresh (or tinned) anchovies. I have a preference for tinned anchovies but both work well. Season with salt & pepper. Next, dribble either the olive oil or the linseed oil over the mixture whilst continuing to blend. The sauce does not need to emulsify like a mayonnaise. It’s preferable if its runny. Add any fresh …

Original home-made ginger beer

Ingredients 1 litre water, 1 cup of whole cane sugar (can be adjusted lower if too sweet), 1 lemon, 1 large ginger root (add more if you like it gingery there is no upper or lower limit) OR one-two tea-spoons of dried ginger, Ginger Beer Plant – one table-spoon is sufficient – it will grow especially during the warmer summer months. Related links: SCOBY-doby-do and the origins of the mysterious symbiotic! KA POW – and the explosive power of fizzy ferments! YAHOO – and the peculiar tale of the missing ginger beer plant! Direction Begin by chopping the ginger, with skin on, into small pieces and placing them into a blender. Adding some water helps blend the fibrous ginger root. Place the mashed ginger into either a tea-towl or food mill and squeeze as much of the juice out as possible Add the sugar and lemon juice into the squeezed ginger juice. Pour the whole into your fermenting glass container and fill to the top with water. Finally place the ginger beer plant into the glass jar and stir …