All posts filed under: Featured Recipe

Autumn Colours

Master in the Kitchen has been quiet of late. Lots of cooking and baking going on over here but just not enough time to post regularly. Two main reason for this silence – firstly work. Secondly our kitchen is in need of a complete overhaul (more on that in another post). In my free time I’ve been trying to stay stress free by knitting. When I met my husband he never went to football matches. I had never picked up a pair of knitting needles in my life. Now he is totally crazy about our local football team and I spend my spare time knitting.  We’re learning to tolerate each other’s new found loves. I’m not crazy that he likes to spend Saturday evenings in the stands. He’s not overly crazy about me spending every spare minute buried behind balls of wool – but we’re beginning to realise that our new passions are cheaper than purchasing an expensive motor-bike. All things considered we’re exhibiting a fairly mild case of mid-life crisis. My latest project is a …

Roasted haunch of venison

Unlike the tougher neck or “chuck” of a comforting venison stew,  traditional best practice requires neither a marinade nor a slow cook for a haunch of venison. There are, nevertheless, a couple of steps that should be followed in order to make the most of this prime, expensive piece of meat.  As for accomanying flavours the choice is yours – the cook can experiment with herbs and spices. Traditionally juniper berries have always accompanyed a venison be it in a venison stew or a game pie – but so do bay leaves, rosemary, thyme, red wine, quince jelly or red currant jelly …. that is because these flavours complement the late autumn robustness of this wonderful cut so well. For supper on Sunday we ate roasted haunch of venison with a potato and swede bake, red cabbage and a green winter salad (purslane). You could also serve the roast venison alongside creamed or buttered spinach,  roast potatoes and cabbages fried with some bacon. Alternatively, creamed celeriac is a popular choice. There are so many wonderful late autumn flavours to experiment with. The choice, as …

Quince & cardamom-vanilla tart

Ingredients For the sweet pastry 200 gr. plain white flour 100 gr. butter 80 gr. sugar 1 beaten egg A pinch of salt For the filling 3 quinces (or pears if you can’t find quince) 100 ml. cream 2 tbs. plain white flour 3 eggs, beaten 100 gr. sugar 3 tbs. honey 1 vanilla pod 8 cardamom pods, seeded Method Begin by making and blind baking the sweet pastry, the recipe of which is set out here. For the filling If you are using quince they first need to be peeled, cored, thinly sliced and then softened in boiling water for around 40 minutes. If you are using pears you do not need to boil them first. Gently heat the milk, vanilla pod,  cardamom seeds and honey together on the hob for five minutes allowing the vanilla and cardamom to infuse with the cream. Take off the hob and leave to cool until it no longer scalds. Whisk the eggs, flour,  and sugar together in a bowl. When the cream has cooled add the eggy mixture together with the cream …

Quince Cheese

“For the colour will be as diaphanous as an oriental ruby” Before beginning on quince cheese be aware that this recipe requires some individual love and attention. A good meat stew takes time but not the cook’s time. A good quince cheese, on the other hand, requires both time and the cook’s attention. Especially on the second day when the quinces have cooled and need to be turned from a purée into a paste. If you decide to have a bash at this do not plan anything other than spending at least an hour in the kitchen close to the kitchen hob making sure the cheese does not burn as the moisture evaporates over a medium to high heat. The trick is to make sure that before you spread the cheese out in your chosen container the quince purée forms a paste strong enough to knead with the hand. Finally, as with most preserves many recipes – both traditional and new – suggest an equal weight of sugar to fruit. It is, however, possible to make this …

Easter Leg of Lamb soaked in Buttermilk

If you are thinking of having a traditional Easter lamb here is a really simple recipe that is easy to prepare and tastes delicious. A leg of lamb is lovely when roasted with some rosemary and garlic – but soaking it overnight in buttermilk and then leaving it to cook on a low heat for hours is equally delightful – and dead simple. The meat falls off the bone. No wastage. Serve it alongside the classics – roast potatoes, roast carrots, roast parsnips, peas and creamed spinach – and mint sauce of course! Ingredients 1 leg of lamb (try and aim for 200gr/adult portion). 1 lt. or 1 pt. of buttermilk. Chopped mint. Salt & Pepper. Directions Wash and pat the leg of lamb dry. Place in an oven dish with a lid. Sear the fat on the leg and rub a generous sprinkling of salt and pepper over the leg. Add the chopped mint. Cover the leg in buttermilk and leave to rest overnight. The following day put the leg of lamb into the …

Alpine Cheese Fondue

One of the great things about rediscovering traditional food and cooking is learning to embrace all the natural fats we were once warned are the root cause of all our current ills. Of course there are those who always knew, instinctively, that abandoning butter, cheeses and drippings was nonsense. Then again there were many, myself included, who for years spurned melted cheeses, butter or other delicious animal fats convinced they would clog the arteries and make us fat. Now I know that low-fat alternatives are just phoneys with artificial flavourings thrown in to mimic the delicious taste of natural animal fats whilst failing to deliver the necessary nutrients. If you’re going to indulge – indulge in the real McCoy! Best of all kids love the conviviality of sitting around the table poking sticks into a communal pot. Probably not something to be eaten every day of the week given that few of us toil in Alpine fields during the day or hack at timber with a heavy axe in sub-zero temperatures – but then again …