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Bribery and Buttermilk

It’s all very well for me to really “dig” fermented food caught up as I am in the good news of pre-digestion, nutritional optimisation, detoxification and consumption of friendly bacteria but I have to accept that the children in the house have an all together different view on the matter. L., who is eleven and nu. 3 in the pecking order of 4 calls me an “old hag” for offering her fermented dairy drinks. It is easy to understand why. Unless you’re used to drinking fermented dairy products every morning, as was the case in the past, then kefir, yoghurt or buttermilk may well, indeed, seem like the stuff of nightmares. To be fair, I too would have probably ran a mile to avoid drinking soured milk when I was a child/teen-ager and it was only when reading Nourishing Traditions a few years ago, when in my thirties, that I began to buy buttermilk. The first few slugs were, well, challenging. I was doing it on the basis of “this stuff is so good for …

What no letter X in the word tradition? Next!

What has become blatantly clear as I write Master in the Kitchen is that for a new approach, idea or thought to break out of the periphery and enter the conventional the concept requires oodles of sex before those controlling the gate-way to the mainstream will even consider endorsing the view. Traditional food… well lets face it – it’s just not sexy. It is not even vaguely sexy. The word traditional does not contain the letter X. I picture Simon Cowell sneering at me with folded arms, hissing me off stage. Perhaps he would prefer the word Tradix since it sounds vaguely like Matrix? Or he would rather I called my book Mistress in the Kitchen rather than Master in the Kitchen. Mistress in the Kitchen conjures up all kinds of visions none of which remotely resemble sauerkraut, beetroot or kefir. I was most unpopular over the past summer holiday when I removed a heavy pebble from a traditional sauerkraut croque which was being used to weigh down some grated and salted cabbage, radishes and turnips. …